Dog quotes in books are a permanent expression proving that dog love is timeless, amazing, and infinite. Here are some of our favorite dog quotes found in some of our favorite novels, books, and classics.

  • “Owners of dogs will have noticed that, if you provide them with food and water and shelter and affection, they will think you are god. Whereas owners of cats are compelled to realize that, if you provide them with food and water and shelter and affection, they draw the conclusion that they are gods.”
    — Christopher Hitchens (The Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Nonbeliever)
  • “dogs and angels are not
    very far apart”
    — Charles Bukowski (The People Look Like Flowers at Last)
  • “Petting, scratching, and cuddling a dog could be as soothing to the mind and heart as deep meditation and almost as good for the soul as prayer.”
    — Dean Koontz (False Memory)
  • “Dogs are better than human beings because they know but do not tell.”
    — Emily Dickinson
  • “And how do you know that you’re mad? “To begin with,” said the Cat, “a dog’s not mad. You grant that?” I suppose so, said Alice. “Well then,” the Cat went on, “you see a dog growls when it’s angry, and wags it’s tail when it’s pleased. Now I growl when I’m pleased, and wag my tail when I’m angry. Therefore I’m mad.”
    — Lewis Carroll (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland / Through the Looking-Glass)
  • “Dogs do speak, but only to those who know how to listen.”
    — Orhan Pamuk (My Name Is Red)
  • “No matter how close we are to another person, few human relationships are as free from strife, disagreement, and frustration as is the relationship you have with a good dog. Few human beings give of themselves to another as a dog gives of itself. I also suspect that we cherish dogs because their unblemished souls make us wish – consciously or unconsciously – that we were as innocent as they are, and make us yearn for a place where innocence is universal and where the meanness, the betrayals, and the cruelties of this world are unknown.”
    — Dean Koontz (A Big Little Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog)
  • “Dogs, lives are short, too short, but you know that going in. You know the pain is coming, you’re going to lose a dog, and there’s going to be great anguish, so you live fully in the moment with her, never fail to share her joy or delight in her innocence, because you can’t support the illusion that a dog can be your lifelong companion. There’s such beauty in the hard honesty of that, in accepting and giving love while always aware that it comes with an unbearable price. Maybe loving dogs is a way we do penance for all the other illusions we allow ourselves and the mistakes we make because of those illusions.”
    — Dean Koontz (The Darkest Evening of the Year)
  • “A person can learn a lot from a dog, even a loopy one like ours. Marley taught me about living each day with unbridled exuberance and joy, about seizing the moment and following your heart. He taught me to appreciate the simple things-a walk in the woods, a fresh snowfall, a nap in a shaft of winter sunlight. And as he grew old and achy, he taught me about optimism in the face of adversity. Mostly, he taught me about friendship and selflessness and, above all else, unwavering loyalty.”
    ― John Grogan, Marley and Me: Life and Love With the World’s Worst Dog
  • “Such short little lives our pets have to spend with us, and they spend most of it waiting for us to come home each day.
    It is amazing how much love and laughter they bring into our lives and even how much closer we become with each other because of them.”
    ― John Grogan, Marley and Me: Life and Love With the World’s Worst Dog
  • “A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes. Status symbol means nothing to him. A waterlogged stick will do just fine. A dog judges others not by their color or creed or class but by who they are inside. A dog doesn’t care if you are rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his. It was really quite simple, and yet we humans, so much wiser and more sophisticated, have always had trouble figuring out what really counts and what does not. As I wrote that farewell column to Marley, I realized it was all right there in front of us, if only we opened our eyes. Sometimes it took a dog with bad breath, worse manners, and pure intentions to help us see.”
    ― John Grogan
  • “I love them, they are so nice and selfish. Dogs are TOO good and unselfish. They make me feel uncomfortable. But cats are gloriously human.”
    — L.M. Montgomery (Anne of the Island (Anne of Green Gables, #3))
  • “After years of having a dog, you know him. You know the meaning of his snuffs and grunts and barks. Every twitch of the ears is a question or statement, every wag of the tail is an exclamation.”
    — Robert R. McCammon (Boy’s Life)
  • “I like dogs. You always know what a dog is thinking. It has four moods. Happy, sad, cross and concentrating. Also, dogs are faithful and they do not tell lies because they cannot talk.”
    — Mark Haddon (The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time)
  • “I think if human beings had genuine courage, they’d wear their costumes every day of the year, not just on Halloween. Wouldn’t life be more interesting that way? And now that I think about it, why the heck don’t they? Who made the rule that everybody has to dress like sheep 364 days of the year? Think of all the people you’d meet if they were in costume every day. People would be so much easier to talk to – like talking to dogs. ”
    — Douglas Coupland (The Gum Thief)
  • “Once you have had a wonderful dog, a life without one, is a life diminished.”
    — Dean Koontz (A Big Little Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog)
  • “But with dogs, we do have “bad dog.” Bad dog exists. “Bad dog! Bad dog! Stole a biscuit, bad dog!” The dog is saying, “Who are you to judge me? You human beings who’ve had genocide, war against people of different creeds, colors, religions, and I stole a biscuit?! Is that a crime? People of the world!”
    “Well, if you put it that way, I think you’ve got a point. Have another biscuit, sorry.”
    — Eddie Izzard (Glorious)
  • People favor underdogs but follow only top dogs.
    Fight for a few underdogs anyway.What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight.
    Build anyway.

    People really need help but may attack you if you do help them.
    Help people anyway.

    Give the world the best you have and you’ll get kicked in the teeth.
    Give the world the best you have anyway.”
    — Kent M. Keith (The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council)

    “You can’t have too much dog in a book.”
    — Gail Honeyman (Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine)

  • “Slowly, Anna put up a hand to his muzzle and began to scratch that spot behind the ear where large dogs keep their souls.”
    — Eva Ibbotson (A Countess Below Stairs)
  • “I once saw a politician walking a dog, and I thought, “How absurd—an animal walking an animal.” Then I thought, “If given the choice, I’d rather vote for the dog.”
    — Jarod Kintz (This is the best book I’ve ever written, and it still sucks (This isn’t really my best book))
  • “Perhaps one central reason for loving dogs is that they take us away from this obsession with ourselves. When our thoughts start to go in circles, and we seem unable to break away, wondering what horrible event the future holds for us, the dog opens a window into the delight of the moment.”
    — Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson (Dogs Never Lie About Love: Reflections on the Emotional World of Dogs)